Simply enter your keyword and we will help you find what you need.

What are you looking for?

Realpolitik: Exposing India’s Political System

Longlisted | Book Awards 2021 | English Non-fiction

Realpolitik: Exposing India’s Political System

Political parties are more than just an idea or a representation. They are full-fledged organizations of committed grassroot-level workers helping to build the party brick by brick. Many factors come into play in the rise and survival of a political party. Realpolitik: Exposing India’s Political System delves into the structure and hierarchy of political parties, political godfathers and dynasty politics. It examines the career roadmap of political workers, appeasement of marginalized groups for vote bank politics, tackling dissent, the play of power and money, and the setbacks when tall leaders desert the party.

Full Title: Realpolitik: Exposing India’s Political System

Author: Mamta Chitnis Sen
Publisher: Sage Publications

Award Category: English Non-fiction
About the Book: 

Political parties are more than just an idea or a representation. They are full-fledged organizations of committed grassroot-level workers helping to build the party brick by brick. Many factors come into play in the rise and survival of a political party. In this book, various leaders and party workers from across party lines bring you insight stories about their associations with political parties, their role in electioneering and fundraising, their emotional investment and its toll on their personal and professional lives. Realpolitik: Exposing India’s Political System delves into the structure and hierarchy of political parties, political godfathers and dynasty politics. It examines the career roadmap of political workers, appeasement of marginalized groups for vote bank politics, tackling dissent, the play of power and money, and the setbacks when tall leaders desert the party.

A deeply fascinating read for people interested in the Indian political system and a ‘manual’ for those interested in a career in Indian politics.


About the Author: 

Artist and writer Mamta Chitnis has worked with publications such as Mid-Day, Society and The Sunday Guardian where she handled the political beat for Maharashtra. She headed Dignity Dialogue, India’s foremost magazine exclusively for the 50 plus age group as Executive Editor. Mamta was also the Secretary of Mumbai Youth Congress from 2007 to 2010. Since 2015, Mamta has been handling Media Advocacy for Child Rights and You (CRY) – an NGO working for the rights of underprivileged children in India. Mamta also teaches Journalism and Communications for Development as guest faculty at St Xaviers Institute of Communications (XIC) in Mumbai. An avid traveller and writer, she regularly writes for One India One People and The Sunday Guardian.


Excerpt: 

Party Workers and Their Maintenance
Unlike the Congress, the BJP and the CPI (M) invests a considerable amount of time and effort in nurturing their party workers mainly because they are cadre-based. Capacity-training programmes are conducted across all districts including local levels to empower them. To keep their cadre updated on the developments, these programmes are well documented and widely publicized through many newsletters and periodicals that both parties frequently publish and circulate. The BJP is largely supported by the Rashtriya Swayamsewak Sangh (RSS), its parent body. Although the RSS office bearers deny the relation between the two, a large number of BJP party workers over the years have been promoted and elevated to various political positions with the support of the RSS. Dr Manmohan Vaidya, sahsarkaryavah of the RSS informs that the RSS is not a political party and neither does it promote the BJP.
‘Any political party can approach us. It is just that since the BJP has been seeking our advice and support on a lot of things over the years, people tend to believe that RSS is supporting only the BJP, which is not the case,’ he says. He hands me a book, About RSS— Rashtriya Swayamsewak Sangh, published by the organization, which mentions that the RSS was established in 1925 and conducts social work across all states and districts of the country through its 40,000 shakhas.


Write a Review

Review Realpolitik: Exposing India’s Political System.

Your email address will not be published.