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Prisoners of Revolution – A political novel

Nominated | Book Awards 2020 | Creative Writing in English (Fiction & Poetry)

Prisoners of Revolution – A political novel

Author: Amar Mudi
Publisher: Niyogi Books

Award Category: Creative Writing in English (Fiction & Poetry)
About the Book: 

On 25 may 1967, in an obscure village of Bengal, nine men, women, and children died in police firing, while trying to take possession of the surplus land of a big landlord. It was a shock for a complacent nation that was oblivious to the plight of its peasants. That marked the beginning of the Naxalite movement. ‘Revolution comes through the barrel of the gun’ was what inspired them. But how was the dream of a revolution to change the social order so brutally extinguished? Prisoners of revolution: a political novel offers a hypothesis—how the movement unravelled through six momentous years in babulpur, a Microcosmic representation of thousands of other villages in Bengal. A fascinating fusion of fact and fiction, this book will appeal to the informed General reader as much as those interested in sociology, politics, ethnic movements, and Naxalite. From the author of the critically acclaimed novel curse of bad am Pahar: savages of the East.


About the Author: 

Born in 1955 in Ranisarai, West Midnapur, West Bengal, Amar Mudi has a master’s degree in Mass Communication. The author of the critically acclaimed novel, Curse of Badam Pahar: Savages of the East, he has many translation works into Bengali to his credit—Orhan Pamuk’s novel, My Name is Red, Ismail Kadare’s The Successor, Imre Kertesz’s Fatelessness, and Manohar Shyam Joshi’s Hindi novel, Kyaap. He has also published a compilation of poems, Jiban Jatra, and plays like Uttaradhikar and Thakurdar Coffin.


Review: 

A new novel set against the backdrop of the Naxalite movement that had its genesis in an obscure village of West Bengal provides a direct window to the real life experiences of the people who willingly or unwillingly became a part of the campaign. Amar Mudi’s “Prisoners of Revolution: A Political Novel” recounts the tempestuous movement that unravelled through six momentous years from 1967 to 1973 in a place called Babulpur, a microcosmic representation of thousands of other villages in Bengal.
– The Week

 

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